Cabinet Logic (2016)

On January 20, 2016, while I was serving as a senior scholar at the IKKM at the Bauhaus University, I presented “Cabinet Logic: A History, Critique, and Consultation on Media Furnishings.” You can find a video of my talk here.

While the material qualities of our media technologies, and our material engagements with them, have evolved over the millennia – and particularly within the past decade – we still rely on physical supports, furnishings, to scaffold our interactions with media. Even “the cloud” that seems to float above us today relies on heavy architecture for its operation. These furnishings – bookshelves, desks, charging stations, server racks, and even beds, as more and more of us not only read but also watch movies and tackle emails from under the sheets – serve as material supports for the storage and delivery of media resources, while they also frame organizational systems and embody particular technical protocols. These structures render complex intellectual and political ideas material and empirical. In this project I aim to study how the design of organizational furnishings, both physical and conceptual, give form to epistemology, politics, and affect.